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Government eases the path to sell public land to its pals

October 20, 2014

http://saveourwoods.co.uk/articles/infrastructure-bill/parliaments-new-chainsaw-the-infrastructure-bill/

Shopping for Christmas

October 19, 2014

If you are looking for a stocking filler this Christmas, do try our novel “A Christmas Malice”, now out in paperback as well as for Kindle. Just click on the link!!!

 

A Christmas Malice: An Inspector Abbs Novella

A Christmas Malice: An Inspector Abbs Novella

Buy from Amazon

Government invents public-path law and misleads landowners

October 16, 2014

stravaigerjohn:

Sadly, there are rambling groups I have seen merrily going round rather than sticking to the definitive map route.

Originally posted on CampaignerKate:

Over the last few months the familiar websites of agencies such as Natural England have been sucked into a generic government website http://www.gov.uk. The detailed information has been severely reduced and dumbed down.  In the case of public rights of way it is plain wrong.

The web page for ‘Public rights of way: landowner responsibilities’ says:

You should leave fields with cross-field footpaths uncultivated (not ploughed) unless users can easily walk around the edge of the field (my emphasis).  The legislation says no such thing.  

Section 134 of the Highways Act states that in the case of cross-field footpaths and bridleways the occupier of a field may plough or otherwise disturb the path surface if it is not reasonably convenient to avoid doing so.  There is nothing about deciding whether people can walk (or ride) round the edge.  It goes on to say that the disturbance must not render…

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Steel Knotts – Pikewassa

October 16, 2014

Last Sunday we set out from the new church at Martindale, partly to climb Steel Knotts but also to try and hear the bellowing of stags in the Martindale deer forest.

Martindale and the cone of the Nab

Martindale and the cone of the Nab

It was one of those perfect Lakeland days, the mist of the early morning dispersed except for cloud inversions over the deeper hollows and the long

Pikewassa (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Pikewassa (c) John Bainbridge 2014

stretch of Ullswater. Within an hour, even those had cleared to offer a day of blue sky and such clearness that every fell, rock and bracken stalk seemed clearly delineated.

We had not long passed Lanty Tarn before we heard the first stag bellow. Then several more times as we climbed the sloping path up towards the wall that marks the edge of the deer forest and the turn up to the summit of Steel Knotts, or Pikewassa, as its rocky tor is known.

From the path there were wonderful views up the dale to the The Nab, that once-forbidden hill that had access granted to it under the Countryside and Rights of Way Act (CRoW),

On the summit there were clear vistas over most of the northern fells, and across Fusedale up towards the line of the Roman Road making its way to High Street.

Martindale and The Nab from Pikewassa

Martindale and The Nab from Pikewassa

We descended by the path down towards Howtown. This is a clear path at first, but it soon becomes quite steep, overgrown, rocky and slippery on the final parts of its descent.

Worth it though for the very clear views of a very placid Ullswater.

A really excellent day for a fell walk.

Ullswater from Steel Knotts (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Ullswater from Steel Knotts (c) John Bainbridge 2014

The stags will be bellowing for a while yet, but I recommend that you get there early in the day or late in the afternoon to hear them at their best.

Ullswater (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Ullswater (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Don’t tinker with Tinkers’ Lane

October 14, 2014

stravaigerjohn:

Another nonsense. When will these people leave our tracks alone?

Originally posted on CampaignerKate:

When the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Bill was going through parliament, with its pernicious provisions for gating orders on public paths, ministers said it would only be used in urban areas, where crime and anti-social behaviour were a problem.  The bill became the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005, with no such safeguard included. 

However, it has largely been used in urban areas, often to the detriment of path users and the benefit of adjoining property owners who have been able to incorporate gated routes into their gardens.

Puzzled
I was dismayed and puzzled to receive a proposal for a gating order from Warwickshire County Council on Tinkers’ Lane, Lapworth.  This unclassified road runs from the busy A3400 Stratford Road, about a mile south of the M40 junction 16 (close to its junction with the M42).  It goes eastward to join Hole House Lane which links with Wheatsheaf Lane in a triangle.

Tinkers' Lane plan

As you can…

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A novel way to spend the time

October 11, 2014

If you are looking for something to read this weekend please do click on the links and read the reviews of the novels. And if you have been a reader and written a review then thank you again.

 

A Seaside Mourning: An Inspector Abbs Mystery

A Seaside Mourning: An Inspector Abbs Mystery

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The Shadow of William Quest: A William Quest Victorian Thriller

The Shadow of William Quest: A William Quest Victorian Thriller

Buy from Amazon

 

 

A Christmas Malice: An Inspector Abbs Novella

A Christmas Malice: An Inspector Abbs Novella

Buy from Amazon

The Church of the Nine Tailors

October 7, 2014

On our way to Wisbech we halted at the village of Upwell, situated on the River Nene, to see the church that was the inspiration for Dorothy L. Sayer’s famous detective story “The Nine Tailors”, featuring her hero Lord Peter Wimsey. Norfolk 2014 069

Although the setting of the exterior is very different fromUpwell Church

Upwell Church

Upwell, the interior is spot on. You can well imagine Wimsey there, the dark wooden tiered galleries – Georgian – allowing you to get right up to the hammerbeams and spandrels of

Upwell Church

Upwell Church

the roof.  And particularly close to the many carved angels. A rare opportunity to get up near to the ceiling of an English church.

Upwell Church (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Upwell Church (c) John Bainbridge 2014

If the church is locked, you can borrow the key by stepping across the river to the Post Office.

Stone Head at Upwell Church (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Stone Head at Upwell Church (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Upwell Church (c) John Bainbridge 2014

Upwell Church (c) John Bainbridge 2014

 

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